19/05/2008

ETTJ - Una Mae Carlisle

Una Mae Carlisle nasceu em Ohio, em 1915. Tocando piano e cantando desde a adolescência, em 1932 é ouvida por Fats Waller, com quem faz amizade e recebe incentivo para realizar uma série de gravações, várias delas em companhia do mestre (veja, por exemplo, a versão deles para I Can’t Give You Anything But Love). Aos poucos, Carlisle estabelece seu próprio estilo ao piano e na voz, que utiliza com uma rouquidão intimista. Pouco antes de iniciada a Segunda Guerra, Carlisle passeia pela Europa, fazendo sucesso na Inglaterra, Alemanha e França, onde chega a tocar no famoso Bouf su lê Toit, em Paris. Com os bombardeios, retorna a New York, onde trabalha e grava ativamente. Em 1941 grava com John Kirby, além de liderar diversos grupos, contando com a presença de músicos do naipe de Russell Procope, Charlie Shavers, Ray Nance, Lester Young e Benny Carter. Ainda na década de 40’ Carlisle faz sucesso no rádio, sucesso este que repetirá mais tarde, na televisão. Embora ainda ativa e bem recebida pelo público na década de 50’, Carlisle é obrigada a se retirar da música por problemas de saúde, vindo a falecer em 1956, com apenas 41 anos. Para os amigos argonautas, fica a faixa ( ), além de algum material extra, inclusive músicas, no site The Authentic History Center. Segue bio segundo Doo Woop Gino, que também oferta a discografia da moça Aqui. I first became aware of Ms. Carlisle when I viewed her performances of I'm A Good Good Woman and I Like It 'Cause I Love It on the VHS collection of "Soundies" performances entitled Louis Jordan and Friends, 1941-1945. Her coy jiving style fascinated me and I began acquiring what I could of her work and seeking information about her from various sources. Una Mae Carlisle was born on December 26, 1915, in Xenia, Ohio. She was "discovered" by Fats Waller late in 1932. He invited her to play on his radio show at station WLW in Cincinnati during Christmas week when Una Mae turned seventeen. She was still in High School at the time, and her mother had approved her Christmas vacation in Cincinnati because she was to stay with her elder sister. When her vacation was over, she refused to return home, becoming a professional musician working with Waller at WLW.Fats' contract with WLW expired in 1934 and he left Cincinnati for New York. Una Mae left America in 1936 to tour Europe, reportedly with the revue Blackbirds of 1936 and spent the next three years there, mostly in London and Paris. In London, on May 20, 1938, she recorded three discs that were released on the Vocalion label, including Don't Try Your Jive On Me. Her backing band for that session included the expert West Indian musicians Dave Wilkins (trumpet) and Bertie King (clarinet and tenor sax). She became highly successful in England, Germany and France, where she worked at the Boeuf sur le Toit ("The Ox on the Roof"), a cabaret in the Rue du Colisée in Paris [named for the 1920 one-act farce by Jean Cocteau, scored by Darius Milhaud with themes based on Brazilian dance rhythms - a pantomime involving a boxer, a dwarf, a bookie, a woman in a red evening gown, a policeman who gets beheaded and is later revived, and a noisy bar full of people]. While in Paris in 1939, she was one of two pianists in a combo headed by clarinetist Danny Polo (Danny Polo And His Swing Stars) which recorded four sides for Decca. She then returned to New York where she undertook several successful engagements and record dates, the first of which was a session with Fats Waller in November 1939 for Bluebird in which she and Fats combined to sing I Can't Give You Anything But Love. She began recording on her own for Bluebird in the summer of 1940. She soon had several hits, including Walkin' By The River with Benny Carter; Blitzkrieg Baby with Lester Young; and I See a Million People with Charlie Shavers and John Kirby. As early as 1938 Una Mae began suffering with mastoid trouble and in 1941 she was hospitalized for several weeks to treat this condition. Bluebird dropped her from its roster during the 1942-1944 American Federation of Musicians ban on recording (the "Petrillo Ban"), so she signed with Joe Davis for whom she recorded more than a dozen tracks, one of which was 'Tain't Yours with ace trumpeter Ray Nance, who had just left Duke Ellington's band. It was during her stay with Davis that she was featured in the "Soundies" which first brought her to my attention. In between bouts of ill health she played clubs and hotels and appeared on radio shows, including a week-long salute to Fats Waller on WNEW in New York in February of 1945, approximately a year after his death. Her career kept going into the 1950s when she became involved in films and her own radio and television shows. Her last studio session was for Columbia in New York on May 8, 1950. She retired due to her illness in 1954 and died in New York on November 7, 1956. Carlisle sang in a husky, intimate manner, and her warm sensual voice and use of delayed phrasing proved to be as effective on swing numbers as it was on ballads.

7 comentários:

Dirce disse...

Beleza!

Anônimo disse...

Lester, depois coloca mais alguma coisa da menina, gostei dela. Um abraço, Jaime.

Marília disse...

Não conhecia Lester, obrigada pela dica. bju

Bala Perdida disse...

Gostei da moça e me diverti c/ o site The Authentic History Center, pena que as músicas são apenas aperitivos, sendo que podemos comprar os discos, a preços razoáveis...

lauro disse...

nao conhecia a moça, muito bom

Crispin Gardona disse...

Esse blog tem umas velharias boas...

Paula Nadler disse...

Adorei!

bju